Daniel Benjamin

Dickey Center Director Named to Holocaust Museum Council

May 8, 2017 |  Dartmouth News | Bill Platt

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin was sworn in as a member of the Council of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum—the museum’s governing body—at a ceremony in April during the national Days of Remembrance commemoration of the Holocaust. 

“Particularly at this moment, when anti-Semitism, xenophobia of all kinds, and anti-migrant sentiment are on the rise, I’m excited to work with the Museum,” says Benjamin.

He was asked to join the museum’s Committee on Conscience, whose mandate is “to alert the national conscience, influence policy-makers, and stimulate worldwide action to confront and work to halt acts of genocide or related crimes against humanity,” according to the museum.

Retired President of the Supreme Court of Israel Talks About Social Justice

October 5, 2015

The Honorable Aharon Barak is the retired President of the Supreme Court of Israel. He has been described by Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan as "the judge or justice in my lifetime whom, I think, best represents and has best advanced the values of democracy and human rights, of the rule of law and of justice.”

Justice Barak discussed “Human Dignity: A Constitutional Value and Constitutional Right" in a lecture on September 28, 2015, hosted by the Dickey Center for International Understanding. He spoke as the Rabbi Marshall Meyer Great Issues Lecture on Social Justice at Dartmouth.

Justice Barak discussed the origins of the notion of human dignity, tracing the concept through classical antiquity, the great world religions and philosophy as well as its incorporation into modern constitutional law. He will also address a range of contemporary issues involving human dignity and questions of law.

View a video of his talk.

Dartmouth a Lead on Fulbright Arctic Program

October 22, 2014  Dartmouth Now

Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, was selected by the U.S. State Department as one of two distinguished scholar leaders of the newly established Fulbright Arctic Initiative. His work focuses on climate change and the effect of rapid warming on the polar regions.

Virginia, the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, and Professor Michael Sfraga, a geographer and vice chancellor for university and student advancement from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, will take lead roles in the new Fulbright Arctic research program, which will fund interdisciplinary work for some 16 scholars from the eight countries that sit on the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental forum of the eight member states that border the Arctic Circle.

Why the Vegas Shooter Did It

October 13, 2017  |  POLITICO MAGAZINE

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin writes in Politico Magazine on the speculation around why Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and wounded almost 500 in the worst mass killing in US history. What was his motive? Possibly simply fame, in an age when the Internet makes instant fame possible.

Paddock thus becomes the latest embodiment of a pattern that has emerged in recent decades. In a world gushing with information about fresh atrocities on the internet and social media, one where screaming chyrons and shouting talk radio hosts have become ubiquitous, a small number of individuals seek to make their mark through record-setting violence. By doing so, they hope to distinguish lives hitherto marked by insignificance or failure.

Read his article online

 

1917 Centennial Series

Also see the Dartmouth News article on the 1917 Series.

DOWNLOAD LIST OF EVENTS (pdf)

“The past is never dead. It's not even past,” William Faulkner famously wrote in his novel Requiem for a Nun.  Here at the Dickey Center, we tend to focus on the present and the foremost issues of the day.  Sometimes, though, it is necessary to head upstream and reconsider the historical events that brought us to where we are. 

This year’s fall term is one of those times, and we are devoting a good deal of energy to an unusual series of events marking the centennial of 1917, a year with a good claim to be the pivotal one in the transition from the relative peacefulness of the 19th century to the tumultuous, all-too-tragic 20th century. The year was filled with political drama and bloodshed, but two events stand out: the October Revolution in Russia and the entry of the United States into World War I.

Is Trump Fighting Terrorism?

June 4, 2017  |  POLITICO

by Daniel Benjamin

Is Trump Fighting Terrorism?  Or is he just tweeting about it, while making it worse?

Donald Trump came to the presidency on a wave of overheated rhetoric about the terrorist threat, the failures of his predecessors, and promises, as he said in his inaugural address, to “unite the civilized world against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate completely from the face of the Earth.” Four months into his term, and on the heels of Saturday’s terrorist attack in London, which killed seven and injured dozens in the third attack in Britain in three months, it’s worth asking: Is Trump actually delivering decisive counterterrorism?

On Iran and anti-extremism, Trump strikes different note from his predecessors

May 22, 2017  |  PBS Newshour

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin talked to the PBS Newshour about whether President Trump is making a shift in foreign policy after his trip to Saudi Arabia and the tone of the language he used there.

"He’s gone all in, in terms of standing with them [Sunni Arabs] and with the Israelis against Iran. I think that brings with it some challenges.

I think it’s also noteworthy that he pushed the Saudis and others to do more against terrorism themselves, but it was quite interesting that the way that he described terrorism, it was really kind of flat. It was in very good vs. evil terms, but no larger discussion of what the drivers of terrorism are, no discussion about bad governance, about economic stagnation, about any repression.

And, as a result, it leaves the impression that this is going to be purely about military law enforcement, and not anything else, which is really at odds with the policy we had, which was that you can’t shoot your way out of this."

Russia’s Game: From the End of the Cold War through the Election of 2016

May 3, 2017 | YouTube

Earlier this year, Ambassador Daniel Fried retired from the State Department after 40 years of service. Watch his talk at Dartmouth on May 3, 2017 about Russia's role in the world from the Cold War to the 2016 election. 

Ambassador Fried served in his most recent position as the State Department’s Coordinator for Sanctions Policy since January 28, 2013. Prior to that, Ambassador Fried was Special Envoy for Closure of the Guantanamo Detainee Facility starting on May 15, 2009, with the additional responsibility as the Secretary’s Special Advisor on Camp Ashraf (Iraq) from November, 2011. Daniel Fried served from May 5, 2005 until May 15, 2009 as Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs and as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for European and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council from January, 2001 to May, 2005. He served as Ambassador to Poland from November, 1997 to May, 2000.

A Voice from the American Wilderness

April 12, 2017  |  The Lancet

Writing in The Lancet, one of the oldest and best known medical journals, Editor-in-Chief Richard Horton gives a detailed analysis of the recent Dartmouth and Dickey Center symposium on global health, held on April 12, 2017. 

At an inspiringly timed conference held last week—Global Health in the Era of De-Globalisation—Dartmouth academics and alumni gathered to discuss what Ambassador Daniel Benjamin called “the great unravelling."

...Dartmouth is on the front lines of what might turn out to be one of the greatest acts of civil protest since the Vietnam War—a rebirth of the social role of the American university, triggered by the values of public, global, and planetary health.

Just What Is Trump Trying to Do in Syria?

April 14, 2017  |  POLITICO MAGAZINE

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin, writing in POLITICO Magazine with co-author Steven Simon, asks what foreign policy objective President Trump's limited raid on the Syrian air base on April 6, 2017, was meant to deliver. 

Let’s start with the the scale of the air raid itself. In the annals of pinprick strikes, Trump’s Tomahawk attack now stands as the pinprickiest. 

Read the entire article in POLITICO.

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